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Putrajaya

About

The project was started in 1993 and the federal capital officially moved in 1999, although the site is still far from complete. Putrajaya became a self-governing federal territory (wilayah persekutuan) in 2001, the third in Malaysia after Kuala Lumpur and the island of Labuan.

The name literally means “princes’ (putra) success (jaya)”. Officially, the site is named in homage to Malaysia’s first prime minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra.

Ever since the Asian economic crisis of 1998 development has slowed down markedly, and while there aren’t any of the rusting half-built concrete shells that still litter KL and Bangkok, the careful eye will spot more than a couple of once cleared and dug-up but now abandoned fields (often with a crane or two stuck in the mud too). Basically, the infrastructure is largely in place but the buildings and occupants aren’t, leading to the impression of a giant swath of hilly jungle crisscrossed by 8-lane highways with no other cars on them, and the occasional beautifully sculpted lake garden with no people in sight.

That said, the area remains under heavy construction and both people and companies are slowly moving in. As of 2009, the population has surpassed 50,000, although there’s still a long way to go to the targeted 300,000. Inevitably, development isn’t always occurring in expected ways: Cyberjaya has to date mostly succeeded in attracting call centers and data warehouses, R&D laboratories. The new twin cities may look very different in 5-10 years’ time. The project was started in 1993 and the federal capital officially moved in 1999, although the site is still far from complete. Putrajaya became a self-governing federal territory (wilayah persekutuan) in 2001, the third in Malaysia after Kuala Lumpur and the island of Labuan.

The name literally means “princes’ (putra) success (jaya)”. Officially, the site is named in homage to Malaysia’s first prime minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra.

Ever since the Asian economic crisis of 1998 development has slowed down markedly, and while there aren’t any of the rusting half-built concrete shells that still litter KL and Bangkok, the careful eye will spot more than a couple of once cleared and dug-up but now abandoned fields (often with a crane or two stuck in the mud too). Basically, the infrastructure is largely in place but the buildings and occupants aren’t, leading to the impression of a giant swath of hilly jungle crisscrossed by 8-lane highways with no other cars on them, and the occasional beautifully sculpted lake garden with no people in sight.

That said, the area remains under heavy construction and both people and companies are slowly moving in. As of 2009, the population has surpassed 50,000, although there’s still a long way to go to the targeted 300,000. Inevitably, development isn’t always occurring in expected ways: Cyberjaya has to date mostly succeeded in attracting call centers and data warehouses, R&D laboratories. The new twin cities may look very different in 5-10 years’ time.
Putrajaya is Malaysia’s third and latest Federal Territory. Built on an expansive marshland and former oil palm estate in Selangor, the city spans an area of almost 5,000 hectares and lies 25 km from Kuala Lumpur. Putrajaya takes over the administrative functions of the capital city Kuala Lumpur and is part of the Multimedia Super Corridor project of the Malaysian government.

Much organisation and planning have gone into the development of Putrajaya as a modern city with the latest communication technologies and progressive infrastructure. The streets are elegantly designed with a European feel, along with well-paved roads while the government buildings are a blend of modern architecture with Islamic arts. Commercial, authoritative and residential areas have been divided into precincts that blend into each other cohesively. A waterway cuts through the city, flowing into a large lake. The concrete landscape is balanced with lots of parks, greenery and wetlands but because the land is relatively flat, it does not look lush.

There are several places that visitors can explore. Those coming from KLIA airport will only take minutes to reach Putrajaya. On the other hand, there are plenty of bus and railway services to ferry you to Putrajaya from Kuala Lumpur.

Includes

– Pick-up and drop-off service from major hotels in Kuala Lumpur.
– Surcharge applicable for hotels in other areas
– Services of an English Speaking Licensed Guide.
– Goods and services tax

Excludes

– Meals and drinks (unless specified)
– Personal expense
– Tips and gratuities
– Optional activity costs

Specifications:

Meeting Point: Hotel pick-up
Duration: 6 hours
Availability: daily at 2:00 PM
Languages: English, Farsi
Package Price: US$45 (Adult) / US$40 (Child)

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4 Hours
13
RM45
RM40

RM45
per adult

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